F is for flowers, fleas and frogs..

F is for flowers, fleas and frogs..

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No not really fleas, but for Fleabane which is more accurately known as Erigeron. These are plants I’d seen sprawling everywhere in lots of coastal locations (e.g St Ives above). I really wanted this in my garden so I bought some seeds somewhere and planted them and they germinated quite happily, I gave a few away too. But when they finally flowered they clearly were not erigeron karvinskianus, the flowers were quite different. Pretty in their own way but not what I had really wanted (see below the little pink ones on the right with a strange stain on each leaf)

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So I gave in and bought a plant at the garden centre. I immediately separated it and took a couple of cuttings and they mostly took too, so hopefully it will be in my garden (probably self seeding everywhere!) for years to come. Love it, (and the lovely pot from Waitrose).

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This is another fleabane, erigeron glaucus which grows naturally all around here, and a root dug up from a friend’s garden has now established very happily. Why fight to get something to grow where its not happy, when you can just take advantage of the plants that thrive here! I’m always peering over garden walls to see what is thriving in the neighbourhood!

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This year I thought I’d get a pond. I’ve not a lot of space so decided to use a small tub instead. I filled it with the some rocks and waited for the rain to fill it up before I bought some plants. Then one day it disappeared. Hmm! It appears that G had needed a bucket to mix some cement and had commandeered my “pond”. Pond mark 2 was more successful, and G is strictly forbidden from touching it. Got a couple of small plants and then waited and watched until the wildlife turned up. When I was tidying up ready for the builders to come in and do the paving I disturbed an enormous frog hiding in some long grass behind some pots. He wasn’t too happy about that, but I was delighted to see how my pond had attracted such a big predator of my numerous slugs and snails! Do make yourself at home Mr Frog.

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Up there with the best performers of the year have to be the Fuschias which have thrived, and most are still brightening up all the shady spots of the garden, blooming their little socks off.  The one on the top (donated by a family member) however did come to a sudden halt and start producing seed pods only which was a little strange – perhaps due to underwatering at one point.

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And currently the tallest plant in the garden, the wonderful Fennel that attracts hoverflies, bees and other insects, and then the chiffchaffs eating the insects! It towers over everything else with its glorious arms held out to the heavens, and the birds polish off most of the seeds over the Winter.

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And finally Ferns. I wanted some of these for the shady corners and my brother brought me some all the way from the Midlands. Apparently they have been running riot in his greenhouse, so I will have to watch them carefully! Ferns are some of the oldest plants some dating back 350 million years. They have no seeds or flowers but reproduce by spores.

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Where would a garden be without Flowers, Fruit and those fabulous Fronds.. 🙂

 

City flower
Raised under street lights
Hothouse rose
Born in the shade
It could not hold you
The empire skyline
Could never keep you
From turning to flame

Chorus:
You find me in the shadows
And the shade
Show me how to bloom
I promise I won’t fade
City flower
Wrapped around my heart
Like a daisy chain
No one can tear apart

Lyrics, Jeffrey Foucault

 

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